“It might be a great deal if they were selling shoes, but they’re selling cosmetic surgery.”

What’s In Your Stocking This Year?

Some men spend weeks or even months searching for that perfect Christmas present for their wives. But what if your husband decided to give you cosmetic surgery for Christmas? Maybe you discussed it in the past. You might have said you could use a little work, “maybe some filler to get rid of those crow’s feet, maybe a boob job to perk up your breasts.” Perhaps you said you wouldn’t have these cosmetic procedures done because you didn’t have the money to pay for them. With this idea fresh in his mind, and being the good husband he is, he decided that the perfect Christmas present would be a cosmetic surgery gift certificate.

Posted: 20 December 12

How would you respond? Would you be pleased? Offended? Would you be grateful or throw it back in his face? Well, if you’re like many women, you’d probably be overjoyed that you could finally get those younger looking eyes and the new set of breasts you’ve always wanted.

Before you make that decision, you may want to read the following.

Almost 40 percent of cosmetic surgery procedures in Australia are booked between October and December. Surprising, I know. It makes you wonder, what exactly are these people preparing for? Is it for Christmas or New Years Eve parties? Or maybe it’s a little bit of both.

The most common motivator may have to do with the countless deals floating around the Internet. Such online advertised specials as “ACT NOW” or “BUY ONE PROCEDURE, GET 30% OFF THE SECOND!” might get your attention, but often deals like these are too good to be true.

That’s because often these deals have a catch. The catch, and it’s a BIG catch, is that usually there is a very short window of time in which you have to have the procedure. It might be a great deal if they were selling shoes, but they’re selling cosmetic surgery. And decisions about cosmetic surgery should never be made in haste.

Cosmetic surgery of any kind should be well thought out and planned in advance by the individual in question, not a spouse or anyone else. In fact, many people who consider having cosmetic surgery think about it for months or even years before making a final decision. Some decide to get it done; others conclude that the procedure is not for them.

The important lesson here is that it should be their decision, with no persuasion or outside influence. When you give your spouse a gift certificate for cosmetic surgery, even though you may not “intend” it, pressure is being exerted on your spouse to have the surgery.

But say you know your spouse like the back of your hand, and you know that this is what he or she wants, and you are right!  Be wary, be very wary, of internet deals of any kind. Deals only valid for a limited time are particularly suspect. Not to mention the fact that choosing a surgeon based on a “good deal” is a seriously bad idea.

This recent Press Release from The Australasian College of Cosmetic Surgery says it all:Cosmetic surgery not on Santas listLooking for last minute Christmas gift? Cosmetic surgery isnt it,” The ACCS’ Code of Practice prohibits advertising time-sensitive coupons and discounts for cosmetic surgery. The new Commonwealth Medical Advertising Guidelines also ban such marketing practices.

When you make an appointment for cosmetic surgery, ask your doctor some of these important questions:

  • What are your accreditations?
  • How many times have you performed this procedure in the past year?
  • What are the risks involved with this procedure?

You’ll also want to examine a portfolio of before and after pictures, so you can see the doctor’s results.

Questions you’ll want to ask yourself are:

  • Do I have confidence in this doctor? What are my alternatives?
  • Do I feel confident about having this procedure? If not, what are my other options?
  • Has the doctor answered all my questions to my full satisfaction?

Cosmetic surgery should never be taken lightly, and it should be entirely your own decision. No one, even your own spouse, should make that decision for you. And although a gift certificate or big discount on cosmetic surgery may sound like a good idea, in practice it’s not a good idea at all.

Join the Conversation

  • Nicole says:

    You know, women also put considerable time into buying gifts for men. Not that either should be considered worthy past times. Just felt the need to point it out.

    OTOH, if two people in an intimate relationship know how the other person is feeling, and their partner has done all the research and is just putting the procedure off due to financial constraints, I don’t see any problem in offering to pay for it. I certainly would, just as I would buy my partner a present he has been dreaming about, but not buying for the same reason.

    Same thing applies to close friends or even family. As long as you know how things stand.

    The main thing is, it should not come as a surprise. And certainly not from those discount/voucher sites.