Tubular Breast Correction

Tubular or tuberous breast deformity affects some young women during puberty, in one or both breasts. The condition results in underdeveloped cone-shaped breasts with enlarged areolae and the nipple area set wide on the chest. When it occurs only on one side, it leads to breast asymmetry.

Tubular breast deformity is a congenital malformation that only becomes obvious when the breasts begin to develop. It is present at birth but is not inherited.

There appears to be no uniform agreement on the structural cause of tubular breasts. Some experts believe that a constricting ring on the base of the breast prevents its expansion on the horizontal plane. This is what causes the ‘tuberous’ appearance of the breast and forces the breast tissue toward the nipple-areola area. Others believe that herniation of breast tissue can be blamed for the condition. What causes tubular breasts is less important than the emotional discomfort and loss of self-confidence they cause.

Tubular breasts are not merely small. The deformity results in making the breasts narrow at the chest wall, giving them a long tubular shape. The large areolas are set far apart, resulting in an unnaturally wide cleavage.

Tubular breasts are also referred to as constricted breasts, oval breasts, caprine breasts, areolar hernia, hypoplasia (underdevelopment) of the lower pole and tuberous breasts.

The malformation can occur in a single breast or in both breasts.

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